Category Archives: Writing

Publishing Advice: The Best and the Worst (5 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Staff Member: Amber M.

Founder & Owner of: A Not So Jaded Life

Millionaire’s Digest Staff Team, Author, Successful Living and Writing Writer


There is a lot of advice out there for writers trying to perfect their material and send it out into the world. But how much of the advice we receive is in our best interest? What should we heed, and what should we discard?

Continue reading Publishing Advice: The Best and the Worst (5 min read)

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12 Inspirational Writing Tips from History’s Greatest Authors (8 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Staff Member: Amber M.

Founder & Owner of: A Not So Jaded Life

Millionaire’s Digest Staff Team, Author, Successful Living and Writing Writer


1) William Allen White – Journalist/News Editor

“Substitute damn every time you’re inclined to write very; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”

Though often mistakenly referenced as a quote by Mark Twain, White knows that adverbs can be dangerous if used overbearingly (see what I did there?). Very and similar words can bog a sentence down, and are often used where they shouldn’t be.

Continue reading 12 Inspirational Writing Tips from History’s Greatest Authors (8 min read)

It’s True; Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators. Do You Agree? (1 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Staff Member: Amber M.

Founder & Owner of: A Not So Jaded Life

Millionaire’s Digest Staff Team, Author, Successful Living and Writing Writer


A Writer’s favourite word: Tomorrow (a mystical land where 99% of all human productivity, motivation and achievement is stored.)

Continue reading It’s True; Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators. Do You Agree? (1 min read)

My Personal Weight Loss Advice: Just Do It (2 min read)

Recently, I had the priviledge of appearing on a local news program for an interview about my weight loss experience.  It was a brief interview, but I received a lot of positive feedback about it.  The growth continued when the story was replayed online, via the station’s website.

Several viewers reached out to me, and asked me a few questions about my progress, and also asked for advice.  Therefore, I decided to post one of my responses here, in hopes that it will help those who are on the fitness and weight loss journey.

Let me mention though, that because of the path that I chose, it’s taken me some time.  Almost 3-4 years.  But that doesn’t necessarily mean that it will be that long for anyone else.  There are certain steps that I took, while discussing this with my doctor, about what would be best for me since he’s been my doctor my entire life and he knew my family’s history.

TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR FIRST.  For instance, my mother passed away from congestive heart failure; my father passed away from cancer.  Plus, BOTH of my parents were diabetics.  Therefore, he watches my blood sugar and my blood pressure, and make sure there is a sustainable diet that can help me avoid these health issues.  He was worried about me a few years ago; now, he couldn’t be happier with me.

DO WHAT MAKES YOU FEEL THE MOST COMFORTABLE.  I tried many weight loss programs (i.e. Weight Watchers), but there were always some elements that didn’t fit well with me, or something that I didn’t enjoy.  Weight Watchers was OK for me at first, but the point system annoyed me.  I wasn’t too keen on the group meetings, either.  If you try to fit yourself into a box or premade program, you’re more apt to quit and gain back all the weight you lost.  The more you enjoy your program, the more fun you will have, and the more likely you are to see results.  That will motivate you to continue.

Luckily, I’ve been fortunate enough to never have any kind of major illnesses, surgeries or diseases myself, so that was clearly at my advantage.  Here’s a list of the steps that I took to get my weight on track:

  1. WATER, WATER, WATER.  I can’t emphasize enough.  You will go to the bathroom more, but that’s the whole purpose.  It flushes the toxins out of your system and relieves your bloating.  I drink about a gallon of water a day.  DRINK LOTS OF WATER.
  2. MOVE MORE.  I joined a gym and enlisted the help of Assassins (personal trainers).  That accelerated the fat burning process and my weight started to really drop.  I find great joy in working out; I go to the gym at least four times a week (and meet with the trainer once a week).  But you don’t have to join a gym.  You can take a yoga class; go out walking or jogging; bike riding.  Take the stairs instead of an elevator, whenever it’s feasible.  The point is, you have to get the sweat going and get the fat cells burning with an increased metabolism.  You have to move.
  3. WATCH WHAT YOU EAT.  This is a no-brainer, but it’s true. There will be a lot of trial and error here, but that’s why all diets should be individualized.  Try out certain foods to see the affect it has on your body/weight gain.  For myself:  I gave up soda (I don’t even drink diet soda) and all carbonated drinks.  I gave up fried foods.  I limit my red meat.  I don’t eat pork.  No junk food.  No processed foods (i.e. frozen dinners).  I eat my produce as fresh and raw as possible.  I eat lots of chicken and fish.  Also, it helps if you plan your meals.
  4. SEEK OUT ENCOURAGEMENT.  This is a major change in your life, and you can’t do this alone.  I turn to my family, friends, social media and those at the gym/personal trainer, who give me encouragement.  You may be shy about your plans, but the more people who know, the more chances of accountability and motivation.

These are just the basics.  If you’d like some more info, just let me know.  I also included a link to my live television interview.  Hope this helps, and good luck!

KETV.COM – Weightloss Inspiration

 

Writer’s Challenge: Why You Should Connect with Other Writers (1 min read)

It’s always refreshing to connect with other artists, other writers.  Whether it’s in person, through a workshop, or through social media, writers can learn a lot from each other.  We learn new ideas, how to feed off of each other’s energy, and perhaps see new perspectives that we never dreamt were possible. Since we understand how each others’ minds work, we can offer support and encouragement for each other. Continue reading Writer’s Challenge: Why You Should Connect with Other Writers (1 min read)

Beware the Jabberwock, My Son! (2 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Team Member: G. Jefferies

Founder & Owner of: Fiction is Food

Millionaire’s Digest Team, Contributor, Aspiring Author and Writing Writer


And so we arrive at the conclusion of this triplet of posts themed on Genius to Insanity. A very liberal interpretation but having journeyed through Einstein and Poe we arrive at madness and a book by Lewis Carrol you might have heard of entitled Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Continue reading Beware the Jabberwock, My Son! (2 min read)

What is Reality to an Author? (2 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Team Member: G. Jefferies

Founder & Owner of: Fiction is Food

Millionaire’s Digest Team, Contributor, Aspiring Author and Writing Writer


If anybody read last weeks musing, with the genius Einstein featuring as the main protagonist, then you will already be aware I’ve called upon a theme for this very three post series as a way to tackle it – Genius to Insanity
Continue reading What is Reality to an Author? (2 min read)

10 Tips to Get You Started Writing this Month (2 min read)

nanowrimo-banner

As the Ernest Hemingway quote goes, “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.” The quote illuminates a truth for writers everywhere: Writing a novel is much easier said than done.

That fact is one of the reasons why the founder of National Novel Writing Month launched the NaNoWriMo community in 1999. That led to the month of November being known as NaNoWriMo, which encourages writers to bear down and get serious about writing their next novel.

From November 1 through 11:59 p.m. Nov. 30, participating writers are tasked with penning a 50,000-word novel. If they finish early they are encouraged to keep writing. One of the main points of NaNoWriMo is to set writing goals and reach them, as opposed to shooting for a Pulitzer-winning novel (although aiming to write the book of a generation is an admirable endeavor).

  1. First, sign up for NaNoWriMo and create your profile. You will be able to receive help from esteemed authors and connect with fellow writers. Committing to the program will hold you accountable for your writing.
  2. Decide how you want to plan your novel. Yes, there’s even a step before the big steps. The NaNoWriMo website’s places writers into two categories: a “planner” and a “pantser.” The first believes in solid preparation and will likely have their stories fleshed out before Nov. 1. That means if you’re your reading up on these tips, you’re probably in the latter group of those who let their spontaneity take the reins. The latter also prefers to dive right in and see what unfolds along the way.
  3. Prep your novel! If you don’t have somewhat of a story idea already, it’s time to get going. The NaNo website has published videos and tips on how to properly plan for your story for the month ahead.
  4. Check out the literature the site also publishes on tips for character building, fiction writing, story building and more. Plan ahead, but don’t let the planning process keep you from this next step…
  5. WRITE. There’s no avoiding it. The best thing to do is just write.
  6. Once you’ve started, plan your pace for the month and commit to completing a certain amount of words every day. The goal is to write 50,000 words, so the word count is a tangible goal that needs to be met.
  7. Try to write at the same time every day. This doesn’t necessarily work for everyone, but by committing to the same time, you’ll be less likely to push aside the time for socializing or doing chores. Some people prefer writing first thing in the morning, while others prefer the late-night grind. Find your “time” and stick to it.
  8. Reach out to others. The community through NaNoWriMo is meant to help you get the resources and support you need to complete your story. Contrary to popular belief, writing does not just have to be a solitary experience that you share with you and yourself in a cold, damp garret – your writing is meant to be shared. So seek out friends, family members, fellow writers or mentors who might offer you feedback on your writing or even just moral support.
  9. Don’t give up! This might not be the most original tip, but it’s impossible to keep going if you don’t believe in yourself or your story. Keep at it, and keep at it some more. Some days the words will fly, while other days will feel tedious and awful (remember the part about the proverbial “bleeding” – grab those Band-Aids and get back to work).
  10. Have fun. You’re writing a novel, not fighting a war. Have fun and enjoy the process. Nothing beats the beauty of when the human mind and imagination coming together to create something completely original and unique.

So… What are you waiting for? Click here to get started!

7 Editing Rules that Will Totally Transform Your Next Post

1. DON’T PAD YOUR PROSE WITH EMPTY FILLER WORDS

(Or: Avoid Using Grammar Expletives)

Grammar expletives are literary constructions that begin with the words ithere, or therefollowed by a form of the verb to be.

(Expletive comes from the Latin explere, meaning to fill. Think smelly literary landfill).

Common constructions include it is, it was, it won’t, it takes, here is, there is, there will be.

The problem? When ithere, and there refer to nouns later in the sentence or – worse – to something unnamed, they weaken your writing by shifting emphasis away from the true drivers of your sentences. And they usually require other support words such as whothat, and when, which further dilute your writing.

Let’s look at an example:

There are some bloggers who seem to have…

The there are expletive places the sentence’s focus on some nebulous thing called thereinstead of the true focus of the sentence – some bloggers. And the writer must then use another unnecessary word – who – that’s three unnecessary words in one unfocused sentence.

Train yourself to spot instances of therehere, and it followed by a to be verb (such as isarewas, and were) and adjust your sentences to lead with the meat and potatoes of those sentences instead.

(Tip: Use your word processor’s find functionality and search for therehere, and it and determine if you’ve used an expletive).

Other before-and-after examples:

  • It’s fun to edit – Editing is fun
  • It takes time to write – Writing takes time
  • There are many people who write – Many people write
  • There’s nothing better than blogging – Nothing’s better than blogging
  • Here are some things to consider: – Some things to consider are:

Caveat: If you previously described an object using therehere, and it, you’re not guilty of an expletive infraction. For example:

  • I love editing. It’s fun. (This is not an expletive construction since I previously described what it refers to.)

2. DON’T WEAKEN THE ACTION WITH WIMPY WORDS

(Or: Avoid Weak Verbs; Use Visceral and Action Verbs Instead)

Not only does to be conspire with itthere, and here to create nasty grammar expletives, but it’s also responsible for its own class of sentence impairing constructions.

Certain uses of to be in its various forms weaken the words that follow. The solution is to replace these lightweights with more powerful alternatives.

Let’s see some before-and-after examples:

  • She is blogging – She blogs
  • People are in love with him – People love him
  • He is aware that people love him – He knows people love him

Other verbs besides to be verbs can lack strength as well. Use visceral verbs or verbs that express some action. Let’s edit:

  • Give out – Offer
  • Find out – Discover
  • Make it clearer – Clarify
  • I can’t make it to the party – I can’t attend the party
  • He went to Mexico – He traveled to Mexico
  • Think of a blogging strategy – Devise a blogging strategy

3. DON’T CRIPPLE YOUR DESCRIPTIONS WITH FEEBLE PHRASES

(Or: Avoid Weak Adjectives)

Weak adjectives sap the strength from your writing just as nefariously as weak verbs. Use the best adjectives possible when describing nouns and pronouns. And be mindful that certain words, like really and very, usually precede weak adjectives. Take a look:

  • Really bad – Terrible
  • Really good – Great
  • Very big – Huge
  • Very beautiful – Gorgeous

Even if you don’t have a telltale really or very preceding an adjective, you can often give your writing more impact by using stronger alternatives:

  • Dirty – Filthy
  • Tired – Exhausted
  • Scared – Terrified
  • Happy – Thrilled

Even worse than using weak adjectives is using weak adjectives to tell your readers what something isn’t as opposed to telling them what something is:

  • It’s not that good – It’s terrible
  • He’s not a bore – He’s hilarious
  • He’s not very smart – He’s ignorant

4. TRIM FLABBY WORDS AND PHRASES

(Or: Avoid Verbose Colloquialisms)

Today’s readers have limited time and patience for flabby writing. Their cursors hover over the back button, so say what you mean as concisely as possible before your readers vanish:

  • But the fact of the matter is – But (Avoid flabby colloquial expressions when possible)
  • Editing is absolutely essential – Editing is essential (Absolutely is redundant)
  • You’re going to have to edit your work – You’ll have to edit your work or You mustedit your work (Going to and going to have to are flabby expressions)
  • Due to the fact that editing takes time, some people avoid it – Because editing takes time, some people avoid it
  • Every single person should love editing – Every person should love editing (Single is redundant; and shouldn’t married people love editing too? 😉 )

5. DON’T PUSSYFOOT AROUND YOUR VERBS AND ADJECTIVES

(Or: Avoid Nominalization)

Nominalization occurs when a writer uses a weak noun equivalent when a stronger verb or adjective replacement is available. Like expletives, nominals usually introduce other unnecessary words when used.

Count the number of words in the before-and-after examples below, and you will witness how badly nominals weaken your writing:

  • Give your post a proofread – Proofread your post (verb form)
  • Alcohol is the cause of hangovers – Alcohol causes hangovers (verb form)
  • The plane’s approach was met with the scramble of emergency crews – The plane approached and emergency crews scrambled. (verb form)
  • He shows signs of carelessness – He is careless (adjective form)
  • She has a high level of intensity – She is intense (adjective form)

6. THROW OUT THE RULEBOOK ON PUNCTUATION

(Or: Use the Occasional Comma for Clarity)

The rules around punctuation can be complicated, even for the humble comma.

But do you truly need to know the difference between a serial comma, an Oxford comma, and a Harvard comma to write a great blog post? Of course not. (And it’s a trick question – they’re all the same.)

So my philosophy on commas is simple:

Use commas sparingly if you prefer, but if excluding a comma MAKES YOUR READER STOP READING, add another bleepin’ comma – regardless of what any comma police may say.

Let’s look at an example:

You can ignore editing and people reading your post may not notice but your ideas will get lost.

By not including a comma between editing and and, I read this sentence and asked myself, “I can ignore editing and people reading my post? Really?” Of course, readers work out the intended meaning a moment later, but by that time, they’ve already stalled.

So, regardless of what comma rule I may break by adding a comma to this sentence, as long as my readers don’t get confused and stop reading, I don’t care – and neither should you.

Let’s look at another example that needs a comma for clarity:

One day, when you find success you can pull out your golden pen and write me a thank-you letter.

By not including a comma between success and you, I read this sentence and asked myself, “Is success something you can pull out of a golden pen?”

Regardless of your stance on commas, you ultimately want your readers to keep reading. You want them to continue down your slippery slope of powerful content all the way to your call to action – without getting jarred from their trance to contemplate commas with their inner editors or a Google search.

7. BE AS MANIPULATIVE AS POSSIBLE

(Or: Use Noun Modifiers Whenever You Can)

You won’t use this technique often, but at least be mindful of it.

When we use two nouns together with the first noun modifying the second, we are using noun modifiers. I like them because they hack the flab from our writing by shortening our sentences. Let’s review some examples:

  • Tips on editing – Editing tips
  • Great advice on how to boost traffic – Great traffic-boosting advice (Traffic-boosting is a compound noun here)
  • Information regarding registration – Registration information

These sentences have prepositions between the noun sets. Whenever you spot this construction, try to implement this noun-modifying technique.

What’s Your Excuse Now?

These tips are not magical, mystical, or complicated. In fact, you could consider them downright boring, plain, and inconsequential.

But applying smart editing rules is what separates your heroes from the masses, catapults them to success, and makes readers say, “I don’t know what it is about their writing, but it’s absolutely fantastic.”

Look at is this way: You’ve expended a ton of effort on SEO, content marketing, networking, and social media promotion, all in the hopes that more people will notice your blog. So when they arrive, shouldn’t your next post blow their socks off too?

And how about your last post and the one before that? (Yes, you can apply these rules to your old posts too!)

Or are you one of those writers who think they write well enough already? Well, you might be surprised by just how many of these crimes against clarity you’re committing.

Open one of your posts right now and see how many of these editing rules you can apply.

Read each word of your post. Is the word an expletive? Is it a weak verb? A weak adjective? Does it represent nominalization or flab or break any of the other rules mentioned in this post?

Run each word of your post through this process. You will find something to improve. And your writing will be 100% more powerful as a result.

Because the search for perfection never ends.

And your writing is never too good.

Sure, proofreading and editing take time.

And yes, you’re already busy enough.

But your writing heroes edit, and they land the guest posts, book deals, and exposure you only wish you could.

So, take a break from #amwriting and start #amediting right now.

Your success will thank you.

And so will I.

 

Posted by Millionaire’s Digest Staff member and Owner & Founder of A Not So Jaded Life.