Tag Archives: novels

The Number One Tip for Getting Started as a Fiction Writer (1 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Team Member: Yawatta Hosby

Founder & Owner of: Hobby Freelances

Millionaire’s Digest Team, Contributor, Writing Writer


Life is about creating memories. Don’t you agree?

Authors have the gift of capturing moments on the page. A great book has the reader forget that they’re reading. They get lost in the pages and follow the character’s journey as though they are in that fictional world.

Continue reading The Number One Tip for Getting Started as a Fiction Writer (1 min read)

Advertisements

5 Great Books for Teens! (2 min read)

Written By Millionaire’s Digest Team Member: Tyler Wiegmann

Founder & Owner of: TylersBooks

Millionaire’s Digest Team, Contributor, Books and Writing Writer


Getting kids to read can be a struggle, but getting teens to read can be even harder. Here are a few books that are great for reluctant teens.

Continue reading 5 Great Books for Teens! (2 min read)

The Water Beyond the Leap (2 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Team Member: Priya Kavina

Founder & Owner of: Kavara Stories

Millionaire’s Digest Team, Contributor, Writing Writer


A salmon in the river swam steadily upstream and regressed, then again, swam steady then regressed. The water resisted as he swam against it,but propelled him effortlessly as he regressed back downstream. He swam forward eight feet then retreated five. As he advanced, the water around him began to whir as all the other salmon swam head on towards the nearing waterfall. The rocks towered the water high and caused it to fall with such brute force. He watched the other salmon as they disappeared right above the blurry water fizz.

Continue reading The Water Beyond the Leap (2 min read)

15 Quick Books Recommended for Children (1 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Staff Member: Amber M.

Founder & Owner of: A Not So Jaded Life

Millionaire’s Digest Staff Team, Author, Successful Living and Writing Writer


  • The Adventures of Isabel by Ogden Nash
  • A Book of Nonsense by Edward Lear
  • Brats by X. J. Kennedy
  • The Dream Keeper and Other Poems by Langston Hughes
  • Insectlopedia by Douglas Florian
  • Joyful Noise by Paul Fleischman
  • Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
  • My Life, My Love, My Lasagne by Steven Herrick
  • Neighborhood Odes by Gary Soto
  • The Paper Doorway by Dean Koontz
  • Polkabats and Octopus Slacks by Calef Brown
  • Roald Dahl’s Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl
  • Something Big Has Been Here by Jack Prelutsky
  • Street Rhymes Around the World by Jane Yolen
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverste

Continue reading 15 Quick Books Recommended for Children (1 min read)

12 Inspirational Writing Tips from History’s Greatest Authors (8 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Staff Member: Amber M.

Founder & Owner of: A Not So Jaded Life

Millionaire’s Digest Staff Team, Author, Successful Living and Writing Writer


1) William Allen White – Journalist/News Editor

“Substitute damn every time you’re inclined to write very; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”

Though often mistakenly referenced as a quote by Mark Twain, White knows that adverbs can be dangerous if used overbearingly (see what I did there?). Very and similar words can bog a sentence down, and are often used where they shouldn’t be.

Continue reading 12 Inspirational Writing Tips from History’s Greatest Authors (8 min read)

It’s True; Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators. Do You Agree? (1 min read)

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Staff Member: Amber M.

Founder & Owner of: A Not So Jaded Life

Millionaire’s Digest Staff Team, Author, Successful Living and Writing Writer


A Writer’s favourite word: Tomorrow (a mystical land where 99% of all human productivity, motivation and achievement is stored.)

Continue reading It’s True; Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators. Do You Agree? (1 min read)

10 Tips to Get You Started Writing this Month (2 min read)

nanowrimo-banner

As the Ernest Hemingway quote goes, “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.” The quote illuminates a truth for writers everywhere: Writing a novel is much easier said than done.

That fact is one of the reasons why the founder of National Novel Writing Month launched the NaNoWriMo community in 1999. That led to the month of November being known as NaNoWriMo, which encourages writers to bear down and get serious about writing their next novel.

From November 1 through 11:59 p.m. Nov. 30, participating writers are tasked with penning a 50,000-word novel. If they finish early they are encouraged to keep writing. One of the main points of NaNoWriMo is to set writing goals and reach them, as opposed to shooting for a Pulitzer-winning novel (although aiming to write the book of a generation is an admirable endeavor).

  1. First, sign up for NaNoWriMo and create your profile. You will be able to receive help from esteemed authors and connect with fellow writers. Committing to the program will hold you accountable for your writing.
  2. Decide how you want to plan your novel. Yes, there’s even a step before the big steps. The NaNoWriMo website’s places writers into two categories: a “planner” and a “pantser.” The first believes in solid preparation and will likely have their stories fleshed out before Nov. 1. That means if you’re your reading up on these tips, you’re probably in the latter group of those who let their spontaneity take the reins. The latter also prefers to dive right in and see what unfolds along the way.
  3. Prep your novel! If you don’t have somewhat of a story idea already, it’s time to get going. The NaNo website has published videos and tips on how to properly plan for your story for the month ahead.
  4. Check out the literature the site also publishes on tips for character building, fiction writing, story building and more. Plan ahead, but don’t let the planning process keep you from this next step…
  5. WRITE. There’s no avoiding it. The best thing to do is just write.
  6. Once you’ve started, plan your pace for the month and commit to completing a certain amount of words every day. The goal is to write 50,000 words, so the word count is a tangible goal that needs to be met.
  7. Try to write at the same time every day. This doesn’t necessarily work for everyone, but by committing to the same time, you’ll be less likely to push aside the time for socializing or doing chores. Some people prefer writing first thing in the morning, while others prefer the late-night grind. Find your “time” and stick to it.
  8. Reach out to others. The community through NaNoWriMo is meant to help you get the resources and support you need to complete your story. Contrary to popular belief, writing does not just have to be a solitary experience that you share with you and yourself in a cold, damp garret – your writing is meant to be shared. So seek out friends, family members, fellow writers or mentors who might offer you feedback on your writing or even just moral support.
  9. Don’t give up! This might not be the most original tip, but it’s impossible to keep going if you don’t believe in yourself or your story. Keep at it, and keep at it some more. Some days the words will fly, while other days will feel tedious and awful (remember the part about the proverbial “bleeding” – grab those Band-Aids and get back to work).
  10. Have fun. You’re writing a novel, not fighting a war. Have fun and enjoy the process. Nothing beats the beauty of when the human mind and imagination coming together to create something completely original and unique.

So… What are you waiting for? Click here to get started!